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SAILING CURRICULA

Download these Curricula as a WORD FILE
Download Advanced Sailing Notes as a WORD FILE
View Night Sailing Lights Notes

NOTE: Masters students should start the advanced cruising lecture series dates so they are roughly concurrent with onboard classes.


IMPORTANT INFORMATION

1. YOUR STUDENT MEMBERSHIP starts the day of your first onboard lesson. Your instructor will rate you as PROVISIONALLY QUALIFIED to use boats by endorsing the student register. You may reserve boats on the day of use. Be sure to discuss your progress with your instructor on the final day of the class so you can schedule a makeup if needed.

2. CHART REQUIREMENT: Whenever sailing you must have on board and use the proper charts (up to date for the area being sailed). Failure to have and use charts is gross negligence under the Club Agreement and raises your liability in the event of a grounding.

3. ADDITIONAL ITEMS YOU WILL NEED: The launch drivers will provide students with keys for use of boats. You will have to purchase your own winch handles from the club or elsewhere. Members can ask the launch driver for a key to keep for the season.

4. LEAVING FROM THE MOORINGS AND RETURNING: The Club REQUIRES motorized vessels be powered to and from the mooring area with sails lowered. Pearson 31, Pearson 34, Cal 33 and 39 are to be left on moorings 1-7 (largest floats); cruising boats under 30 ft are to be left on moorings # 8-49, (mid-sized floats); Solings and sonar are to be left on moorings 50-72 (smallest floats) in the south rows of the mooring field. Secure mooring pennant to boat with a bowline through the cleat.

5. LEAVING BOATS IN THE MARINA SLIPS: After launch operation hours, boats may be left in slips on the north side of the marina except Wed-Sun during July and August. Be sure masts in adjacent slips are not aligned with each other. Rowboats (blue, wood) are available after launch hours for leaving boats on moorings.

6. SHALLOW WATER AT SEAWALL: The area in front of the Harbor Towers seawall is VERY SHALLOW with NUMEROUS UNDERWATER OBSTRUCTIONS. Keep clear.

7. DRAFT OF VESSELS: All boats except the J29 require 7 feet of water beneath them at all times. The J29s require 10 feet. Chart depths are given at mean lower low water.

8. HEIGHT OF VESSELS: The masts of the Cal 33s, Pearson 34 and Cal 39 PREVENT them from going under the Long Island Bridge (52 feet at mean higher high water).

9. FUEL: If you need to refuel, the following are the correct fuels for each vessel. TWO STROKE OUTBOARDS: gasoline mixed with 12 oz of OUTBOARD MOTOR OIL for each 6 gallons of fuel. INBOARDS: All the inboard boats use DIESEL fuel.

10. USING THE RADIO: Raise the club launch on Channel 10 or by cell phone. (Confirm this with Launch Driver). Club phone is (617) 720-0049.

11. MAKING UP MISSED CLASSES: Classes may be rescheduled with reasonable notice (24 hours). Otherwise they will be rescheduled on a space available basis. Please request make-ups a few days ahead of the time you are available.

12. UPGRADING YOUR INSTRUCTION: You may upgrade to the next level of instruction by paying the prevailing price difference between your current program and the next level plus any new materials. The upgrade price of the Masters 30 or 40 to 40 or 50 varies depending upon whether you have completed the Masters 30 or 40 certification cruise.

13. CREW LIST: You can view the club crew list (for members and students). Add your own name to the list by clicking on "add new message" at the top of the page, be sure to hit post new message at the bottom of the page after entering your information. The list only works if you add your name.

14. Schedule updates: Check our lessons page. Look here for lecture dates, meeting locations, cruises openings, etc.

15. Charts and other accessories can be purchased by phone or email with 24 hours notice to be picked up at the docks. A complete listing of charts we carry is available on our website.

16. Guide sheets for ASA study are available.



DAYSAILING CURRICULUM

(If you are a Masters student Start on P 9 for your daysailing curriculum).

MATERIALS: Sailing Fundamentals, Maptech waterproof chart of Mass Bay and Boston Harbor (or chart #13270), Federal Boating Regulations, tide tables.

SCHEDULES: Weekdays Monday-Thursday 9:30-4:30; OR Weeknights Monday-Friday 5-8:30, Saturday 9-4 (BNAV). OR Weekends, Saturday and Sunday 9-6 each day, and a following Saturday 9-4 (BNAV).

PROPER CLOTHING AND PREPARATION: May and October--best attire is foul weather gear over fleece tops, warm hat, sailing boots and cold weather sailing gloves. June-September--waterproof windbreaker top and pants with boating boots or boat shoes. Bring a change of clothes in a duffel. Avoid denim jeans or tight clothing. Wear fleece on colder days and bring a hat and sunglasses as appropriate. There are public restrooms at Rowes Wharf. Bring water on board since wind, sun and onboard activity are dehydrating. PLEASE, NO BLACK SOLED OR RUNNING SHOES ONBOARD.

(NOTE: Because of the variety of days and times this course is given the curriculum below is a general statement of how to be current for lectures and on board lessons.)

FIRST LESSON CONCEPTS-SAILING: Sailing terminology; the sailing circle and basic sailing maneuvers; how design of the boat contributes to balance; using balance to start and stop the boat and control the tack in restarting; sailing a triangular course on the blackboard; basics of sail trim; mooring under sail, rescuing a man overboard, reefing the mainsail; quick checklist of required safety equipment.

FIRST ONBOARD LESSON: Locate and inspect required safety equipment; discussion of parts of the boat, rigging the sails, leaving the mooring under sail, starting and stopping drills to demonstrate balance and sail interaction; sailing the points of sail and executing the tacking and jibing maneuvers, heaving to.

READING: Sailing Fundamentals 7-23; 36-76; 83-88; 101-107, 129-130.

SECOND LESSON CONCEPTS-EMERGENCIES, SAFETY EQUIPMENT, RULES OF THE ROAD/REGULATIONS: Proper use of the safety equipment onboard: PFD, throwable device, flares, fire extinguisher; anchoring and docking, dealing with thunderstorms and heavy wind conditions, groundings and getting free; emergency actions in case of rig failures, hypothermia; Rules of the Road, other boating regulations; knots.

SECOND ONBOARD LESSON: Sailing the triangular course to put tacking, jibing, the points of sail and sail trim into a meaningful context; person overboard practice.

READING: - Sailing Fundamentals 24-33; 77-81; 91-99; 119-134, 144-147; 175-185; Fed Regs. Pamphlet.

THIRD LESSON CONCEPTS: WIND AND WAVES, TIDES AND CURRENT, NAVIGATION. How the wind over open water, shallow water and into currents affects waves and sailing conditions; tide and current, using the Eldridge tables, learning the chart symbols and the navigation chart to find your way and determine your position. Closing discussion of how the wind velocity and direction, the fetch, current strength and direction, and points of sail contribute to a sailing plan for the day.

THIRD AND FOURTH ONBOARD LESSONS: Landing and takeoff practice, close quarters maneuvering, review of previous lessons and reefing as needed.

READING: Sailing Fundamentals 111-118; Study Maptech Boston Harbor Waterproof Chart for familiarity, review tide tables. Review Operating Procedures section in Fed Reqs. Pamphlet.

FINAL ONBOARD LESSON-BASIC NAVIGATION (BNAV): An introduction to the Pearson 26 equipment (outboard engine operation, roller furling, electrical system, radio, head and stove) precedes a 4 to 5 hour navigation cruise through Boston Harbor to gain familiarity with the islands, landmarks, buoys and other navigation aids featured on the Boston Harbor chart. Anchoring for lunch in lee of one of the islands demonstrates basic anchoring techniques and the use of lateral bearings to determine whether anchor is holding.

SPECIAL NOTE: Students may repeat any part or this entire lesson at no charge on a space available basis.



CRUISING CURRICULUM

(Daysailing, Coastal Nav Cruise, Night Sailing)
(If you are a Masters Student start your cruising curriculum on p 9)

MATERIALS: Sailing Fundamentals, Maptech waterproof chart of Mass Bay and Boston Harbor, Federal Boating Regulations, tide tables.

DAYSAILING SCHEDULES: Weekdays Monday-Thursday 9:30-4:30; OR Weeknights Monday-Friday 5-8:30, Saturday 9-3 (BNAV). OR Weekends, Saturday and Sunday 9-6 each day, plus a following Saturday 9-3 (BNAV).

PROPER CLOTHING AND PREPARATION: May and October--best attire is foul weather gear over fleece tops, warm hat, sailing boots and cold weather sailing gloves. June-September--waterproof windbreaker top and pants with boating boots or boat shoes. Bring a change of clothes in a duffel. Avoid denim jeans or tight clothing. Wear fleece on colder days and bring a hat and sunglasses as appropriate. There are public restrooms at Rowes Wharf. Bring water on board since wind, sun and onboard activity are dehydrating. PLEASE, NO BLACK SOLED OR RUNNING SHOES ONBOARD.

(NOTE: Because of the variety of days and times this course is given the curriculum below is a general statement of how to be current for lectures and on board lessons.)

FIRST LESSON-SAILING: Sailing terminology; the sailing circle and basic sailing maneuvers; how design of the boat contributes to balance; using balance to start and stop the boat and control the tack in restarting; sailing a triangular course on the blackboard; basics of sail trim; mooring under sail, rescuing a man overboard, reefing the mainsail; quick checklist of required safety equipment.

FIRST ONBOARD LESSON: Locate and inspect required safety equipment; discussion of parts of the boat, rigging the sails, leaving the mooring under sail, starting and stopping drills to demonstrate balance and sail interaction; sailing the points of sail and executing the tacking and jibing maneuvers, heaving to.

READING: Sailing Fundamentals 7-23; 36-76; 83-88; 101-107, 129-130.

SECOND LESSON-EMERGENCIES, SAFETY EQUIPMENT, RULES OF THE ROAD/REGULATIONS: Proper use of the safety equipment onboard: PFD, throwable device, flares, fire extinguisher; anchoring and docking, dealing with thunderstorms and heavy wind conditions, groundings and getting free; emergency actions in case of rig failures, hypothermia; Rules of the Road, other boating regulations; knots.

SECOND ONBOARD LESSON: Sailing the triangular course to put tacking, jibing, the points of sail and sail trim into a meaningful context; person overboard practices.

READING: - Sailing Fundamentals 24-33; 77-81; 91-99; 119-134, 144-147; 175-185; Fed Regs. Pamphlet.

THIRD LESSON: WIND AND WAVES, TIDES AND CURRENT, NAVIGATION. How the wind over open water, shallow water and into currents affects waves and sailing conditions; tide and current, using the Eldridge tables, learning the chart symbols and the navigation chart to find your way and determine your position. Closing discussion of how the wind velocity and direction, the fetch, current strength and direction, and points of sail contribute to a sailing plan for the day.

THIRD AND FOURTH ONBOARD LESSONS: Landing and takeoff practice, close quarters maneuvering, review of previous lessons and reefing as needed.

READING: Sailing Fundamentals 111-118; Study Maptech Boston Harbor Waterproof Chart for familiarity, review tide tables. Review Operating Procedures section in Fed Reqs. Pamphlet.

FINAL ONBOARD LESSON-BASIC NAVIGATION (BNAV): An introduction to the Pearson 26 equipment (outboard engine operation, roller furling, electrical system, radio, head and stove) precedes a 4 to 5 hour navigation cruise through Boston Harbor to gain familiarity with the islands, landmarks, buoys and other navigation aids featured on the Boston Harbor chart. Anchoring for lunch in lee of one of the islands demonstrates basic anchoring techniques and the use of lateral bearings to determine whether anchor is holding.

COASTAL NAVIGATION CRUISE: Every Saturday or Sunday 9-7. PROPER CLOTHING AND PREPARATION: You will be exposed to sun, wind and water so be prepared with boots, foul weather gear over fleece top, cold weather sailing gloves and warm hat for May and October. Windbreaker, sunglasses, hat, boat shoes and short finger gloves other times. Bring water, snacks and cash for an onshore lunch and take seasick pills one hour before boarding. PLEASE, NO BLACK SOLED OR RUNNING SHOES ONBOARD.

ONBOARD CLASS-EQUIPMENT REVIEW: Use of the Albin 28 or Scampi 30 including the roller furling, stove, head, sea valves, radio and inboard diesel engine, safe refueling of the stove and fuel tanks. -NAVIGATION: Classroom or cockpit orientation to the coastal navigation routine including setting compass courses, taking bearings, plotting fixes and keeping a DR plot, brief of set and drift corrections, set sail. - BOAT HANDLING: Docking under power, setting fenders and securing the boat properly to the dock, anchoring, reefing.

READING: Sailing Fundamentals 153-160

NIGHT SAILING: Friday evenings 5-12 pm aboard Pearson 31 Topics covered: Review of vessel lighting requirements, determining the course and type of vessel by its lighting configuration, discussion of Boston Harbor's nighttime aids to navigation, tips for sailing at night.

ONBOARD CLASS: Orientation to the Pearson 31, wheel steering, docking under power, tie-up, fendering; 8-12 pm commence a night sail of Boston Harbor to show the perils and potentials of sailing in a busy environment with numerous conflicting backgrounds.

READING: Sailing Fundamentals 140-141, Chart #1 (1210TR) lights, buoys and beacons. Fed Reqs Brochure: Lights, Nav aids.



MASTERS 30/40/50 BAREBOAT CHARTER COURSE

(Daysailing, Coastal Nav Cruise, Night Sailing, Advanced Sailing, Advanced Cruising lectures and 2 day or 5 day Certification Cruise.

DAYSAILING
MATERIALS: Annapolis Book of Seamanship, Eldridge Tide and Pilot Book, Chart #1/Chart 1210 TR, Maptech waterproof Chart of Mass Bay and Boston Harbor, Navigation Kit, Boating Safety Addendum, Federal Boating Regulations Optional texts: Pyzell Coastal Navigation, Sailing Fundamentals, and Cruising Fundamentals.

SCHEDULES: Weekdays Monday-Thursday 9:30-4:30; OR Weeknights Monday-Friday 5-8:30, Saturday 9-4 (BNAV). OR Weekends, Saturday and Sunday 9-6 each day, and following Saturday 9-4 (BNAV).

PROPER CLOTHING AND PREPARATION: May and October--best attire is foul weather gear over fleece tops, warm hat, sailing boots and cold weather sailing gloves. June-September--waterproof windbreaker top and pants with boating boots or boat shoes. Bring a change of clothes in a duffel. Avoid denim jeans or tight clothing. Wear fleece on colder days and bring a hat and sunglasses as appropriate. There are public restrooms at Rowes Wharf. Bring water on board since wind, sun and onboard activity are dehydrating. PLEASE, NO BLACK SOLED OR RUNNING SHOES.

(NOTE: Because of the variety of days and times the course is given the curriculum below is a general statement of how you should prepare to be current for lectures and on board lessons.)

FIRST LESSON-SAILING: Sailing terminology; the sailing circle and the basic sailing maneuvers; how the construct of the boat contributes to balance; using balance to start and stop the boat and control the tack in restarting; sailing a triangular course on the blackboard; basics of sail trim; mooring under sail, rescuing a man overboard, reefing the mainsail; quick checklist of required safety equipment.

FIRST ONBOARD LESSON: Locate and inspect required safety equipment; discussion of parts of the boat, rigging the sails, leaving the mooring under sail, starting and stopping drills to demonstrate balance and sail interaction; sailing the points of sail and executing the tacking and jibing maneuvers.

READING: Annapolis pgs 2-31, 40-41, 44-62, 68-69, p 73, p 89, 94-95, 322-324, 378-379

SECOND LESSON-EMERGENCIES, SAFETY EQUIPMENT, RULES OF THE ROAD, KNOTS: Proper use of the safety equipment onboard--PFD, throwable device, flares, fire extinguisher; anchoring and docking, dealing with thunderstorms and heavy wind conditions, groundings and getting free; emergency actions in case of rig failures, hypothermia; Rules of the Road, other boating regulations; knots.

SECOND ONBOARD LESSON: Sailing the triangular course to put tacking, jibing, the points of sail and sail trim into a meaningful context; person overboard practice.

READING: - Annapolis pgs 74-93, 98-101, 142-153, 160-187; Eldridge p 6, 7, Safe Boating Addendum. Fed Regs. Pamphlet

THIRD LESSON: WIND AND WAVES, TIDE AND CURRENT, NAVIGATION. How the wind over open water, shallow water and into currents affects waves and sailing conditions; tide and current, use of the Eldridge tables, learning the chart symbols and the navigation chart to find your way and determine your position. Closing discussion of how the wind velocity and direction, the fetch, current strength and direction, and points of sail contribute to a sailing plan for the day.

THIRD AND FOURTH ONBOARD LESSONS: Landing and takeoff practice, close quarters maneuvering, review of previous lessons and reefing as needed.

READING: Annapolis pgs 60-65, 134-141, 188- 194, 302-322, 327-329, 332-333, 340-355; Eldridge pgs 5, 11, Scan 12-16, read bottom of pg 12, pg 232; Chart # 1 (1210TR) Scan. Scan Boston Chart for familiarity. Safe Boating Addendum. Review Operating Procedures section in Fed Reqs. Pamphlet.

FINAL ONBOARD LESSON-BASIC NAVIGATION (BNAV): An introduction to the Pearson 26 equipment (outboard engine operation, roller furling, electrical system, radio, head and stove) precedes a 4 to 5 hour navigation cruise through Boston Harbor to gain familiarity with the islands, landmarks, buoys and other navigation aids featured on the Boston Harbor chart. Anchoring for lunch in lee of one of the islands demonstrates basic anchoring techniques and the use of lateral bearings to determine whether anchor is holding.

COASTAL NAVIGATION CRUISE
SCHEDULE: Full day coastal cruise to Cohasset or Marblehead on the Albin 28 or Scampi is given Saturdays or Sundays 9-7; selected Fridays during the summer as a part of a one-week course.

PROPER CLOTHING AND PREPARATION: You will be exposed to sun, wind and water all day so be prepared with a change of clothing, windbreaker or foul weather gear, fleece top, hat, sunglasses and a light lunch. You will dock or anchor out for lunch. Bring snacks, water and cash for onshore lunch and take seasick pills one hour before boarding. NO BLACK SOLED OR RUNNING SHOES ONBOARD.

ONBOARD CLASS-EQUIPMENT REVIEW: Use of the Albin 28 or Scampi 30 including the roller furling, stove, head, sea valves, radio and inboard diesel engine, safe refueling of the stove and fuel tanks. -NAVIGATION: Cockpit orientation to the navigation that will be done during the trip including setting compass courses, taking bearings, plotting fixes and keeping a DR plot, brief of set and drift corrections. - BOAT HANDLING: Docking under power, setting fenders and securing the boat properly to the dock, anchoring and reefing. Set sail for the day.

READING: Annapolis 60-72, 180-185, 278-279, 302-322, 378-379, 328-329, 352-353, 218-267, 298-301.

NIGHT SAILING
SCHEDULE: Friday evenings 5-12 pm aboard Pearson 31

Topics covered: Review of vessel lighting requirements, determining the course and type of vessel by its lighting configuration, discussion of Boston Harbor's nighttime aids to navigation, tips for sailing at night.

Topics covered: Orientation to the P31, including the diesel engine and cockpit controls, bilge pumps and other equipment, followed by an hour of docking practice under power. 8-12 pm commences a nighttime sail of Boston Harbor to show the perils and potential of night sailing in a busy commercial environment with many conflicting backgrounds.

READING ASSIGNMENT: Annapolis, review 62-72, 182-187, 206-207, new reading 196-198. Chart 1 (back of 1210TR) lights, buoys and beacons.

ADVANCED SAILING
SCHEDULE: Saturday and Sunday 9-6 given on the J29

PERFORMANCE ADJUSTMENTS/SPINNAKERS:

Review the concept of sailboat balance including the interaction of sail and immersed hull on vessel control. Discussion of the contribution that sail shape and size make to vessel balance and control. How and when to adjust the genoa fairleads, halyard tension and furling to shape the jib. How to use the outhaul, cunningham, vang, traveler, backstay, mainsheet, and reefing to control and shape the mainsail for optimal speed and control under varying wind and sea conditions. Setup and use of the spinnaker

SATURDAY and SUNDAY: Practice setup of spinnaker gear on the mooring followed by sailing, navigation and spinnaker practice.

READING ASSIGNMENT: Review Annapolis pgs 14-29 and 74-95; new reading Annapolis pgs 96-108. Tuning and trimming handout will be given in class.

PREPARATION: You will be exposed to the elements for most of the weekend. For inclement or windy weather have sailing boots or boating footwear, foul weather gear, fleece tops and sailing gloves (sailing gloves are particularly important for this class- serious rope burns are possible if the spinnaker is not handled correctly). Fleece windbreakers are also appropriate in milder conditions. Bring a duffel onboard with a change of clothes, warm hat, sunglasses with straps and a lunch for Sunday and water for both days. Take seasick pills. PLEASE NO BLACK SOLED OR RUNNING SHOES.

ADVANCED CRUISING

SCHEDULE: 3 Sunday night lectures 6-10 pm. Start lectures anytime, attend in any sequence; bring a notebook, handouts in class. Note that it is best to attend lecture 1 before lecture 2. Lecture 3 can be taken first.

LECTURE ONE-COASTAL NAVIGATION: Lecture and exercises on the practical use of the navigator's tools to determine position, courses and solutions to navigation problems. Includes time/speed/distance computations, distance off, lines of position, circles of position, danger bearings, transit lines, the Rule of 60, soundings, adjusting for leeway, current set and drift, publications, standard nomenclature, the magnetic compass and understanding the meridians of latitude and longitude. Bring chart 1210TR and Nav kit to class.

READING ASSIGNMENT: Annapolis 206-267, 268-285, and 292-293. Navigation handouts provided in class.

LECTURE TWO-ELECTRONIC AND COASTAL NAVIGATION: Class lecture on the theory and practical use of LORAN AND GPS navigation electronics for course setting and position determination, waypoint setting, courses to steer and other features of modern electronics. Second half of class will involve working out answers to navigation problems given in Lecture One. Bring chart 1210TR and navigation kit to class.

READING ASSIGNMENT: Class handouts and practice problems from lecture 1.

LECTURE THREE-TROUBLESHOOTING VESSEL MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL AND PLUMBING SYSTEMS. A detailed discussion of the fuel, exhaust, cooling systems and engine controls of the diesel engine and how to recognize and solve common diesel problems. Understanding and use of batteries and charging systems on vessels with multiple electrical load demands; understanding and use of plumbing systems and holding tanks on vessels. READING ASSIGNMENT: Class handouts

Additional Reading Assignments:
SAFETY AND SEAMANSHIP: Dealing with heavy weather, heaving to, lying ahull, shortening sail in heavy air on vessels with one line reefing, use of fire extinguishers for various shipboard fires, loss of steering control, signaling for help, setting up the vessel for safety harnesses. Considerations for vessel and crew safety when aground, searching for leaks if the vessel is taking on water. READING ASSIGNMENT: Review Annapolis 302-362

WEATHER: What causes weather, how different air masses form and move and how their consequent interactions form the fronts, clouds and the related features of our daily weather. Discussion of localized conditions, which form independently of air masses such as fog, the sea breeze and land breeze. Discussion of weather charts, highs, lows, wind directions and concluding with a lesson in practical weather predictions of wind velocity and direction, precipitation and cloud cover given the movement of a high or low-pressure system across the region.

READING ASSIGNMENT: Annapolis 112-135



CERTIFICATION CRUISES

Masters 30: A 48 hour cruise with instructor on the Pearson 31. Board the vessel Friday evening 6 pm, set courses for the evening, program the GPS, run jack lines for safety harnesses, provision the boat and get underway by 10pm for an all night sail across Mass Bay to Provincetown while maintaining manual and electronic DR plots and deck watches. Anchor in Provincetown, inflate dinghy, and make morning shore stop. Anchor out Saturday night, possibly in Scituate, and return to Boston Practice docking, anchoring and other vessel maneuvering drills in Boston on Sunday, complete by 7 pm.

Masters 40: A 48 hour cruise with instructor on the Cal 39. Board the vessel Friday evening 6 pm, set courses for the evening, program the GPS, run jack lines for safety harnesses, provision the boat and get underway by 10pm for an all night sail across Mass Bay to Provincetown while maintaining manual and electronic DR plots and deck watches. Anchor in Provincetown, inflate dinghy, and make morning shore stop. Anchor out Saturday night, possibly in Scituate, and return to Boston Practice docking, anchoring and other vessel maneuvering drills in Boston on Sunday, complete by 7 pm.

Masters 50: A 5 day cruise which combines a significant nonstop offshore passage of 100 miles or more with a coastal route return to expose students to the rigors of offshore sailing and the more intricate navigational challenges of sailing near the coast. A typical southern route will leave Boston, sail nonstop outside Cape Cod and Nantucket to Long Island or Block Island, spend a day in port in docking and maneuvering exercises and return via a coastal route incorporating the current hazards of Woods Hole passage and the Cape Cod Canal. Alternate Passage sails north to Boothbay, Monhegan Island or Kennebec River.

PROPER CLOTHING: Foul weather gear, boots/shoes, sunglasses, hats, fleece required for Masters 40 and 50 cruises. Safety harnesses provided on Masters 30/40/50 cruises.

SPECIAL NOTE: Students may repeat any part of this course at no charge on a space available basis.